The Heretics' Hour: Comparing the German and Japanese surrender to the Allies

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2013-04-22 18:54
 
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August 22, 2013

FM Wilhelm Keitel, Chief of Army (center) with Chief of the Luftwaffe Stumpff (left), Admiral Friedenberg of the Kriegsmarine (right) are forced by Eisenhower's threats to surrender to the Soviet Union on May 8, 1945 in Berlin-Karlhorst.

Why didn’t Hitler address the German nation considering its defeat as the Emperor Hirohito did in Japan? Why was Hirohito allowed to live and continue his reign, while Hitler and his party had to be eradicated totally? Why was Japan allowed to keep its industrial capacity and participate in world trade, but Germany not. One reason is the difference between Dwight David Eisenhower (the terrible "Swedish Jew") and Douglas MacArthur.

Carolyn also looks at the continuing media attention to the  “problem” of antisemitism and what to do about it. Friday, April 26 is the 100th anniversary of the rape/murder of 13-year-old Mary Phagan by the Jew Leo Frank in Atlanta, Ga. The Anti-Defamation League was created 100 years ago to defend Frank and has been doing its best to prevent justice for Jews ever since.

Comments

4 Responses

  1. Markus

    April 23, 2013 at 4:36 am

    Thank you, Carolyn for explaining the differences between Japan’s and Germany’s surrender.

    The collective mind of Japan today is that, yes, they lost that war, but they honor their soldiers in gigantic shrines and also speak up in the UN for a peace treaty, while the Germans hate what their soldiers did and do not honor them at all and ignore that they even lack a peace treaty.

    I just thought that an epic farewell speech of Hitler on how things would be, might have given the Germans hope that maybe in 500 years things would change again in their favor.

    To the contrary, Hitler said in an earlier speech that either Germany wins and thereby preserve the Aryan races, or the Jews win and that this would mean the end of the Aryans in Europe.

    So, I can only assume that Hitler did not want to give false hope to the Germans but stuck to his words in silence.

    You constructively critized me for saying that Hitler did not specifically addressed the German nation to what was coming at the end of the war.

    So I will also say what I think as a critique: You praised Hitler for not considering surrender but rather dying the Heldentod. But then you praise Dönitz as well, who did the very opposite. Him signing the surrender had not the same emotional impact, since he was a rightious Admiral and good person, but let’s be honest, he was just another head of state and not this beloved savior of a nation and prophet of his time.

    I questioned Hitler’s suicide because I saw a film that allegedly exposed Hitler’s dead body in Russian possession to be actually a woman’s body. And since we hear all kinds of stories, like the escape to Argentina, I thought both stories (the suicide and Argentina) might be false to divert attention to later argue over non-existing positions. This tactic is always used to manifest a left-right paradigm and avoid the center target.

    I do not believe Hitler just disappeared and lived the good life after 1945 somewhere else, as the Argentina theorists do. But I accept that he killed himself, as the eye witnesses claim until evidence proves otherwise. I only had doubts because of this female body and the known Communist everlasting lies.

    The different approaches to occupy Germany and Japan also proves once more that race is a major factor. While the Germans could be deceived into reeducation and later actually welcome their British, White American, Russian and French brothers and perceive the few Black Americans as an interesting curiosity, the Japanese would never allow this to happen to such an extent simply because Americans are not Asiatic.

    To this day, the Japanese constantly protest in front of American bases and have even forced them out of Okinawa because of this. Germans on the other hand want to love, as you correctly said, especially the Americans. But many in Eastern Germany the Russians also. The Communist party Die Linke, is still very succesful in East (Middle) Germany.

    If China, as 5th main victor of WW2 had an occupation mandate for Germany, people would know, feel, the alien force.

    Thanks again. I’m sorry I didn’t call in. I listened to the show in the archives.

  1. Carolyn

    April 23, 2013 at 1:34 pm

    Markus wrote:

    So I will also say what I think as a critique: You praised Hitler for not considering surrender but rather dying the Heldentod. But then you praise Dönitz as well, who did the very opposite. Him signing the surrender had not the same emotional impact, since he was a rightious Admiral and good person, but let’s be honest, he was just another head of state and not this beloved savior of a nation and prophet of his time.

    Doenitz did not sign any surrender papers afaik; Generals Jodl and Keitel did. When you say “Him signing the surrender had not the same emotional impact” … you can’t mean that you think Hitler should have stuck around to sign surrender papers – do you?

    Hitler was being Hitler, the creator of The Third Reich, and Doenitz was being Doenitz, who was expected to act responsibly in the interests of Germany during an “unendurable” time. Some men choose an honorable suicide, and others carry on under heavy burdens. We are glad that they do. I think every honorable person knows their own role and acts accordingly, in the sense that they can’t act otherwise without violating their innate sense of self. Doenitz’ job was very difficult and I think he made all the right decisions. Because he did, there is now a more complete record of the vile and low-down nature of the American Occupation Force headed by “Ike.”

    That seems to be the only critique you had.

  1. Markus

    April 23, 2013 at 2:49 pm

    Yes, that was it.

    It’s always helpful to reflect one’s thoughts with one another. You have been studying all this for years and know most of the details very well.

    I wasn’t aware that Dönitz did not sign any surrender himself as head of state and commander in chief. So, it was high ranking officials in charge of large divisions who signed the declarations of surrender for their respective units and Dönitz didn’t veto their decisions because it was pointless anyways and then he was captured and imprisoned.

    If so, I retract my criticism.

  1. Collin

    April 27, 2013 at 4:35 pm

    I always wonder for what reason(s) there are zero “tanx” for a podcast..
    Learn to appreciate something and than to talk and talk and talk…
    That’s the reason that I m glad to stay in East Europe.
    You are a great woman Carolyn!

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